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Angela Mar 10, 2009

Angela wrote:

Ritchie's version is described as portraying the harder, more action-packed side of Holmes.

AICN's Moriarty (hah!) has a write-up on his visit to the upcoming Sherlock Holmes set.  Just hearing about how the fight sequence that's linked to this shot plays out has me giddy with excitement:

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/40362

The production values are looking to be on point, too.  As a period piece, it should be interesting to see how they bring it all alive.

Shoe Mar 12, 2009

Carl wrote:

Getting stuck in life and how difficult it is to get "unstuck" is something that resonates with me even at 30, and I assume that feeling is real for a lot of people.

Yeah it's very real.

Life gets very stale sometimes, especially for those of us with 'malcontent predispositions' in our brain chemestries.

Which leads to Escapism..

Whether it's alcohol or whatever have you, it's only natural to look for ways to cope with the 'hollow life syndrome'.


But it's not always raining indoors.. Look for the moments of rebirth whenever you can find them and cherish them, they are the fleeting instants sprinkled down the path of life here and there to heal the tired soul every once and again.

Part of the answer is to re-invent yourself every so often, i guess. Leave your old soul behind when it no longer becomes you and start the next day anew.

Look to the dawning morning sky and take it as it comes. Try to find the balance between the Positive and Negative energies. Look at how others experience the same events and try to learn from them, and why they are the way they are.

Then put your own spin on it.


..Sorry for the preaching, i get ahead of myself sometimes. I'm done rambling now.

XLord007 Apr 7, 2009

I saw Watchmen the other day.  I've never read the comic, so I didn't have any preconceived notions of what it should be.  That said, I thought it was mediocre.  There's very little overarching plot, and most of the time is spent deconstructing a bunch of characters that the audience is never really given much of a reason to care about.  It's visually impressive and goes to great pains to take visual violence to new levels of detail, but I could have done without the insane amount of screen time the blue penis gets.  Why is it now trendy for directors to keep one-upping each other with more and more full frontal male nudity?  At any rate, I'd say it's a rental at best.

Idolores Apr 8, 2009

Saw Watchmen, as well. I read the comic years and years ago (literally been waiting ten years for the film adaptation), and I was very impressed. Here's the thing. I knew exactly what was going to happen scene for scene before it even happened, so I knew the story inside and out. I was extremely curious to see how character development would pan out given the nature of the storytelling, and I was impressed. Rorschach remains just as compelling of a character in the movie as he was in the book, and they managed to make Night Owl out to be cooler than he was before, too, though I guess that's not saying much. They left a lot of shit out, to be sure, otherwise I'm sure the movie'd be five hours long (cementing my belief that this would've worked better as, say, a 12 episode mini-series on HBO or something), but what is there is great.

I've read that the film works best as a companion to the graphic novel, and I'd have to agree on that sentiment. I've noticed that people I talk to who weren't impressed by the movie haven't read the book, so they lack that as a base. Not that there aren't any good reasons to dislike it on its' own merits, just an observation I've made.

Adam Corn Apr 8, 2009

Watchmen was the biggest waste of three hours (preview time included) I've spent at the theater or anywhere else in a long time.

The good: a few cool fight scenes.

The bad: soap-opera acting from several main characters, comic book monologuing and cliche without remorse (especially in the last thirty minutes), ridiculous over-the-top violence, no sense of pacing, and well over an hour of tiresome exposition that rarely serves the story or helps establish any sort of empathy for the characters.

I haven't felt that disgusted at a movie since Beowulf and Fantastic Four 2 (and at least those were short).

On the flip side, Valkyrie and Benjamin Button were both pretty decent.  (2008 releases I know, but they came out this year in Japan and I'm trying to prove I'm not a snob here. big_smile)

Jay Apr 8, 2009

Adam Corn wrote:

comic book monologuing and cliche without remorse (especially in the last thirty minutes), ridiculous over-the-top violence, no sense of pacing, and well over an hour of tiresome exposition that rarely serves the story or helps establish any sort of empathy for the characters.

I find I have a hard time disagreeing with most of this and yet I adored it. I thought I might well hate it. But I didn't. I loved the pacing. Yes, it was completely different to most movie pacing but that's probably what I liked about it. Some of the monologueing exposition didn't work at all but then, for me, a huge amount did. The only one I cringed a little at was the 'joke' about the clown which I didn't like in the book and thought the delivery was pretty poor in the movie.

But, overall, I loved it.

As for it being best as a companion piece to the book, possibly but my wife loved it and she never read the book.

Jodo Kast Apr 8, 2009

avatar! wrote:

And yeah, I do want to watch Watchmen, even though it didn't get good reviews. I don't expect anything groundbreaking or deep, just enjoyable.

Actually, Watchmen was a very philosophical movie. I still think about it, but only because of Dr. Manhattan. I was talking about him with some other people and we concluded he's probably the strongest superhero imagined so far. I don't know much about X-Men but a guy told me that a character named "Apocalypse" is the most powerful and that this Dr. Manhattan is even more capable, since he can teleport. This makes me wonder if anyone has done a real world analysis of the abilities of superheroes, like has been done with Star Trek, Star Wars, and Independence Day. It would be interesting to read what would happen (based on the laws of physics) if such people did exist. As an example, the analysis of Independence Day was particularly interesting because the aliens were very wasteful. All they had to do was orbit our planet and let the gravitational attraction do all the geological mayhem. Or, if they were a bit playful, they could've orbited in the direction opposite our spin. That would've braked the Earth. I don't have to tell you what would happen if the Earth stopped spinning.

So, we know that Dr. Manhattan could manipulate the electromagnetic force. He was clearly making use of the fields, which explains the "action at a distance", since the fields are invisible to our unaided eyes. But teleportation does not use the electromagnetic force. It's simply a result of an inherent property of many particles - spin. So, Dr. Manhattan had many copies of himself, all over the place, some left-handed, some right-handed (refers to direction of the spin). For example, if he wanted to teleport, then he would orient all of his particles to the right. This would cause him to appear wherever he had left a stash of left-handed particles. Of course, this is based on the current understanding of teleportation, which has nothing to do with streaming matter across space. It's the real version of "spooky action at a distance".

Idolores Apr 8, 2009

Jodo Kast wrote:

I was talking about him with some other people and we concluded he's probably the strongest superhero imagined so far.

Well, him and Pre-Crisis Superman, I'd say.

Angela Apr 19, 2009

Angela wrote:

Up - I have really high hopes for Pixar's Up, and I'm keeping to my personal declaration that it's going to be incredible.  The talent involved, specifically Monsters Inc. director Pete Docter and composer Michael Giacchino, is already a formula for success in my book, and early impressions (and here) are already glowing positive.

AICN's Knowles, from the advanced screening in Austin this weekend, has what looks to be the very first review of the movie up.

"After the film – the audience was glowing. It was as if each and every last one of us were 3 feet tall, tiptoeing into our childhood living room on Christmas morning and found our heart’s desire with a big bow on it and with balloons! Lots of balloons. This film isn’t a specified fetish film like MONSTERS, INC, THE INCREDIBLES, WALL-E, CARS, TOY STORY, A BUG’S LIFE or even RATATOUILLE. This is a human adventure primarily – without the obvious childhood fetish item. The fanciful elements concern talking dog collars, giant crazy bird critter and a balloon powered floating house. Otherwise – you’re dealing with humans – humans that have been hurt, have desires, motivations and problems. And nothing could be better."

Angela Apr 24, 2009

Star Trek has been getting unanimously stellar reviews.  I'm not the biggest fan around, but I was still planning on seeing it; I could never resist a good Abrams/Giacchino collaboration.

Any self-proclaimed Trekkies here looking forward to the film?

Carl Apr 24, 2009

Angela wrote:

Any self-proclaimed Trekkies here looking forward to the film?

Since it's targeting the NON-Trekky audience, naturally that's probably got the hardcore trekkies  blasting away at the film (but they'll still go see it anyways).

Adam Corn Apr 24, 2009

I was skeptical after seeing the previews for Star Trek but was gonna see it anyway since I'm a sucker for a big summer movie (most, anyway) and I have faith in JJ Abrams.

After reading the review at Dark Horizons though I'm genuinely excited!  Doesn't make it to Japan till June though sad

Jay Apr 24, 2009

Contrary to Carl's suggestion, I'm hearing very good things from pretty hardcore Trekkies about it. I love classic Star Trek. I think there is no Kirk without Shatner and, well, Shatner is a god among men. So when I first heard of this, I thought it was a pretty horrific idea. On top of that, unlike Adam, Abrams was a turn off, not a turn on.

But the trailers look excellent. I love the look and most of the characters look great. Okay so the guy playing Spock has a squeaky voice without any of the gravitas Nimoy has but Karl Urban seems to be doing a stellar job as McCoy. And I love Simon Pegg.

So I'll definitely be seeing it and hoping for good things.

Amazingu Apr 24, 2009

Jay wrote:

Shatner is a god among men.

Try telling that to someone who only knows him from Rescue 911, like me wink

Wanderer Apr 25, 2009

I'll be going, naturally. wink Used to be a Trekkie... until Star Trek started to suck when DS9 went off the air.

Ashley Winchester Apr 25, 2009

Amazingu wrote:
Jay wrote:

Shatner is a god among men.

Try telling that to someone who only knows him from Rescue 911, like me wink

Wow, completely forgot about that! Crazy, I used to watch that all the time.

Jodo Kast May 2, 2009

I watched my second movie of the year, X-Men Origins: Wolverine. I have to admit it's a good thing to exist these days, to be able to see this kind of stuff. Two hundred years from now, people will wonder how we suffered through our forms of entertainment, but I'm quite happy with them, despite the limitations. Good news for movie soundtrack collectors: it was awesome. Also, they made a new trailer for Transformers 2 (different from the one available online) and Peter Jackson has something really creepy (or not?) coming out, about some District-9. I was really hoping to see a new trailer for G.I. Joe, but no such photons caressed my retinas.

Angela May 2, 2009 (edited May 2, 2009)

Jodo Kast wrote:

Two hundred years from now, people will wonder how we suffered through our forms of entertainment, but I'm quite happy with them, despite the limitations.

Never mind two hundred years, I'm certain there will be people who are going to be echoing that sentiment TODAY.  Critics and fans alike are ripping Wolverine to shreds (you saw that coming), with the biggest insult being that it's even worse than X3: The Last Stand.  Now, I'm probably one of the few who enjoyed X3 to a certain degree, and all of the unanimous hate got me even more curious to see this film.

Having come back from it today, I will say that I dug it quite a bit.  It's no masterpiece for the superhero genre, but it's definitely better than X3, and to some degree, as enjoyable as X1 and X2.  Jackman is, as always, in top form as Wolverine, but Schreiber's Sabretooth is just as good.  The two have a terrific dynamic, their rivalry being the heart of the film - and that singularity, to me, made for an engaging drive.  Their established bond during the opening credits montage was superb, and each one of their fight confrontations are excellent.  I liked the Team X story thread, too, even if they did take a fair amount of liberty on its characters and their story arcs.  Some got a far worse shaft than others, while secondary characters like Gambit could've used a bit more screen time.  The CG also looked hokey and obvious at times, even for comic book movie standards; the final cameo toward the end of the film looked particularly awful.

The soundtrack, though highly derivative of Gregson-Williams' other works, accompanies the film well enough.  It's not a particularly memorable score, and with the exception of the main theme heard in Logan Through Time and "I'll Find My Own Way", it's generally forgettable.  I do like how the two tracks juxtapose the minor and major tones of the main theme, though -- and they do play for two of the best sequences in the film.

By the way, Jodo, if you stayed for the end credits, which epilogue coda scene did you get?  I got the <marked for spoilers>..... Logan trying to remember in the bar one.  Though I think I would've wanted to see the..... Deadpool is really still alive one more.

Carl May 2, 2009

Now they're tacking on varying scenes onto the end of film reels after the credits roll?  That's a new approach..   

Hell, once all films are digitally transmitted to theaters as data, they could REALLY get creative and randomize bits and pieces of footage so that you'd have to watch it repeatedly to see all the scenes...

Jodo Kast May 2, 2009

Angela wrote:

By the way, Jodo, if you stayed for the end credits, which epilogue coda scene did you get?  I got the <marked for spoilers>..... Logan trying to remember in the bar one.  Though I think I would've wanted to see the..... Deadpool is really still alive one more.

I saw the same one (would've preferred the other as well) and I think more people are keen to what's happening (with additional footage). Very few people walked out before the credits were completely finished. I've now made it a habit to remain in my seat until the very end.

  What I enjoyed the most about the film would reveal too much, but I will comment it had something to do with psychology. (Isaac Asimov created similar situations in his Foundation novels, but they were much more clever, naturally.) I'm not familiar with the comics or cartoons with Wolverine, so the movie is the definitive version, from my point of view. As an analogy, imagine an immortal person that lived through the age of the dinosaurs (ignore the fact that humans had not evolved yet). While most people would regard the film Jurassic Park as a definitive source of information concerning dinosaurs, the immortal would probably find it full of flaws. So, the comic book fans are like the immortal. They have information that regular people do not have.

Adam Corn May 2, 2009

Jodo Kast wrote:

Also, they made a new trailer for Transformers 2 (different from the one available online)

Are you sure it wasn't the same as this new one that just went online a few days ago?
http://jalopnik.com/5234950/new-transfo … n-high+res

I don't get too impressed by movie trailers that often anymore but OH MY GOODNESS.  If M.Bay has stuck to his promise of not including the best stuff in his trailers then at the very least we are gonna have some amazing action and visuals.

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